Climate Change Notebook, July 2010

Posted on July 22, 2010

9


Global warming endangering coral in the Red Sea. Summer sea surface temperatures have remained about 1.5 degrees Celsius above normal in the Red Sea over the last 10 years.  During that time growth of the coral, Diploastrea heliopora, has declined by 30% and “could cease growing altogether by 2070,” according to a report from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution published in the July 16 issue of the journal Science.

See: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/view.php?id=44695

Climate change induced sea-level rise threatening Indian Ocean coasts. According to a new study, sea-level rise is taking place unevenly and is particularly high along the coastlines of the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea, as well as the islands of Sri Lanka, Sumatra and Java.  This could aggravate monsoon flooding in highly populated areas.

See: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/view.php?id=44705

Marmots in Colorado becoming fatter and more numerous because of climate change.

But it may be merely the good times before the fall, since climate change may bring along drought in the future.  Prolonged drought has been associated with drops in the marmot populations in the past.

See: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19207-baby-boomer-marmots-fatten-up-with-climate-change.html

Study suggests it may take 100s of thousands of years for oceans to recover from acidification. A study of early events in the earth’s history, where volcanic eruptions sent massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, suggests that ocean acidification may be a very long term problem indeed, if humanity allows it to happen.  The events in the past required as long as a quarter of a billion years to cycle through the entire process.

See: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=ancient-ocean-acidification-intimates-long-recovery-from-climate-change

Every month since February 1985 has been warmer than the 20th century average. The June just past was the warmest June globally, since the beginning of the modern temperature record in 1880.  The highest temperature ever recorded in Asia was set in Pakistan on May 26, 53.5 degrees C.  The sun continues to remain cooler than normal.

See: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=average-global-temperature-rise-creates-new-normal

Posted in: climate change